Alzheimer’s Prevention Trials—The Future Looks Promising

Alzheimer’s Prevention Trials—The Future Looks Promising

Current prevalence estimates for late-onset Alzheimer’s disease LOAD in the United States (U.S.) is approximately 5.1 million.(1) By 2050 the projected prevalence of LOAD is expected to escalate to 13.8 million and a staggering 106.8 million worldwide.(2,3) Pharmacological treatments for LOAD such as cholinesterase inhibitors and NMDA receptor antagonists may slow its progression or attenuate specific molecular pathomechanisms associated with the disease process, but are not long term solutions or curative. While there is active research for more effective disease-modifying drugs* the lack of any significant breakthroughs in the treatment of the disease has propelled a paradigm shift away from focusing solely on a pharmaceutical solution to an inclusive prevention model that emphasizes risk reduction and ultimately the portentous global burden incurred by the disease.

Several clinical trials have recently explored the potential role of prevention-based interventions for decreasing the risk of late-onset Alzheimer’s disease (LOAD) and vascular dementia. The outcomes are encouraging. Multi-dimensional interventional strategies (implementing multiple treatment and prevention modalities simultaneously) versus mono-therapy (employing only with a single treatment modality e.g. drugs) has yielded promising results in reducing the eventual onset of dementia for aging individuals considered to be at higher risk. These trials highlight the potential effectiveness of preventive approaches for individuals deemed to have a higher risk for vascular dementia and LOAD and for the management of Mild Cognitive Impairment (MCI).**

Protected: PREMIUM CONTENT: Blueberry Polyphenols Protect the Brain from the Degenerative Processes Associated with Brain Aging and Alzheimer’s Disease

Protected: PREMIUM CONTENT: Blueberry Polyphenols Protect the Brain from the Degenerative Processes Associated with Brain Aging and Alzheimer’s Disease

The study of plant and fruit polyphenols, a rich source of dietary antioxidants, represents one of the most promising areas of research in the field of anti-aging, and the prevention of degenerative disorders such as Alzheimer’s disease. Recent and ongoing research indicates that polyphenols present in berries and other fruits and vegetables provide protective and supportive nourishment to critical structures (i.e. hippocampus) in the brain responsible for learning, and memory formation and retention.

Protected: PREMIUM CONTENT: Mild Cognitive Impairment (MCI)–Telltale Signs That You May Be At Increased Risk for Dementia or Alzheimer’s Disease

Protected: PREMIUM CONTENT: Mild Cognitive Impairment (MCI)–Telltale Signs That You May Be At Increased Risk for Dementia or Alzheimer’s Disease

Long before a diagnosis of Dementia or Alzheimers disease (AD) is given, brain damage is occurring that leads to, and reflects the gradual downward spiral of mental decline that typifies AD. A cluster of signs that define Mild Cognitive Impairment (MCI), especially memory loss and forgetfulness, may be the early warning indicators that you are at risk for developing AD. If you can visualize a spectrum whereby healthy brain/cognitive function in an individual is on one side of the spectrum, and AD is on the opposite side, MCI would be inching ever so close to the AD side of the spectrum.

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