The Diabetic Brain first chapter is available via a free download!

The Diabetic Brain Podcast Series

Listen Now

The Alzheimer's Solution

Alzheimer’s Prevention Trials—The Future Looks Promising

Current prevalence estimates for late-onset Alzheimer’s disease LOAD in the United States (U.S.) is approximately 5.1 million.(1) By 2050 the projected prevalence of LOAD is expected to escalate to 13.8 million and a staggering 106.8 million worldwide.(2,3)

Oxidative Stress and the Thromboxane Receptor

New research published Oct. 13 by the journal Neurobiology of Aging revealed that the free radicals produced during oxidative stress bind to a protein receptor in the brain designated as “the Thromboxane Receptor A2 (TP)”

TREM2 Gene Mutation Raises The Risk Of Alzheimer’S Disease

Recently (11/13), a rare variant of the TREM2 gene, designated as R47H, was shown to increase the risk of developing Alzheimer’s disease. Individuals with the variant may be up to 3 to 5 times more likely to develop Late Onset Alzheimer’s disease (LOAD).

Alzheimer’s Disease Prevention and Education

PREMIUM CONTENT: Blueberry Polyphenols Protect the Brain from the Degenerative Processes Associated with Brain Aging and Alzheimer’s Disease

PREMIUM CONTENT: Blueberry Polyphenols Protect the Brain from the Degenerative Processes Associated with Brain Aging and Alzheimer’s Disease

The study of plant and fruit polyphenols, a rich source of dietary antioxidants, represents one of the most promising areas of research in the field of anti-aging, and the prevention of degenerative disorders such as Alzheimer’s disease. Recent and ongoing research indicates that polyphenols present in berries and other fruits and vegetables provide protective and supportive nourishment to critical structures (i.e. hippocampus) in the brain responsible for learning, and memory formation and retention.

PREMIUM CONTENT: The Alzheimer’s Gene Puzzle – Genetic Links To Late Onset Alzheimer’s Disease (Part 1)

PREMIUM CONTENT: The Alzheimer’s Gene Puzzle – Genetic Links To Late Onset Alzheimer’s Disease (Part 1)

Genetic risk factors to Late Onset Alzheimer’s Disease (LOAD) are significant. A recent study of nearly 12,000 Swedish twin pairs, age 65 and older, determined that 58% to 79% of Alzheimer’s risk is genetic. This study showed that in male identical twins, when one brother had Alzheimer’s disease, the other developed the disease 45% of the time. In female identical twins, when one sister had Alzheimer’s disease, the other developed the disease 60% of the time. While this study did not delve into specific gene influences in LOAD, numerous studies have identified Apolipoprotein E4 (ApoE4), as a prominent genetic risk factor for LOAD. About 25% of the population has one copy of the ApoE4 gene and individuals with the the ApoE4 gene are estimated to make up approximately 40%-80% of the Alzheimer’s disease population.

PREMIUM CONTENT: Brain-Derived Neurotrophic Factor – Growth Factor Demonstrates Promise in the Protection Against Alzheimer’s Disease Progression

PREMIUM CONTENT: Brain-Derived Neurotrophic Factor – Growth Factor Demonstrates Promise in the Protection Against Alzheimer’s Disease Progression

One of the longest held thoughts about damage to our brain’s cells (neurons) was that once they were lost, it was a fait accompli. Damaged neurons were considered damaged goods, never to regain their function, and without any hope for regeneration. Fortunately, for those concerned about recovery from brain trauma, stroke, and the neurological damage associated with Alzheimer’s disease (AD), there is promising research indicating that growth factors in the brain, not only promote brain structure and function associated with memory and learning, they can promote brain growth and recovery from damaging events to the brain.

PREMIUM CONTENT: Mild Cognitive Impairment (MCI)–Telltale Signs That You May Be At Increased Risk for Dementia or Alzheimer’s Disease

PREMIUM CONTENT: Mild Cognitive Impairment (MCI)–Telltale Signs That You May Be At Increased Risk for Dementia or Alzheimer’s Disease

Long before a diagnosis of Dementia or Alzheimers disease (AD) is given, brain damage is occurring that leads to, and reflects the gradual downward spiral of mental decline that typifies AD. A cluster of signs that define Mild Cognitive Impairment (MCI), especially memory loss and forgetfulness, may be the early warning indicators that you are at risk for developing AD. If you can visualize a spectrum whereby healthy brain/cognitive function in an individual is on one side of the spectrum, and AD is on the opposite side, MCI would be inching ever so close to the AD side of the spectrum.

PREMIUM CONTENT: Alpha lipoic acid Protects Brain Cells–Antioxidant Mechanisms For Alzheimer’s Prevention

PREMIUM CONTENT: Alpha lipoic acid Protects Brain Cells–Antioxidant Mechanisms For Alzheimer’s Prevention

Alpha lipoic acid (ALA), a naturally occurring nutrient found in many foods and available in supplemental form, is also synthesized in humans where it serves in energy metabolism and as a vital antioxidant. ALA is a unique antioxidant in that it is both water and fat-soluble, which enables ALA to confer its antioxidant benefits to all the cells and cell structures of the body. Another important characteristic of ALA is that it is part of the antioxidant team that includes vitamin E, C, coenzyme Q10 and glutathione. ALA regenerates theses antioxidants as they are metabolized in their protective antioxidative roles.

PREMIUM CONTENT: Insulin, Brain Function And Alzheimer’s Disease – Is Insulin Resistance To Blame For Alzheimer’s?

PREMIUM CONTENT: Insulin, Brain Function And Alzheimer’s Disease – Is Insulin Resistance To Blame For Alzheimer’s?

Insulin fulfills an indispensable role in your body’s utilization of blood sugar (glucose). In type 2 diabetes and Metabolic Syndrome, insulin’s function of glucose uptake into the body’s cells is impaired due to a resistance to insulin that develops over time. This insulin resistance pattern which defines the disease process of the above mentioned disorders, is now seen as a link to the degenerative spiral that occurs in Alzheimer’s disease (AD) over and above the role of insulin in glucose metabolism in the brain. Insulin resistance and its role in inflammation, and impaired insulin function in the brain are now understood to be underlying pieces of the Alzheimer’s puzzle.

Free Premium Content Access

Get It Now

The heart brain connection…exercise and a fit cardiovascular system is vital to healthy blood flow to the brain. To optimize circulation and cerebral blood flow is critical for the delivery of oxygen, glucose and nutrients to our brain. Reductions or alterations of cerebral blood flow is a risk for stroke and vascular dementia. Researchers led by Nathan Johnson PT, DPT, PhD of the University of Kentucky College of Health Sciences, have demonstrated a positive correlation between fitness and blood flow to areas of the brain where the classical lesions associated with Alzheimer’s disease first appear.

Learn more here...
... See MoreSee Less

Research from the University of Kentucky College of Health Sciences was able to demonstrate a positive correlation between fitness and blood flow to areas of the brain where the hallmark tangles and p...

View on Facebook

Testimonials

What a tremendous resource! Thank you for putting all of this great research in one place! I am also extremely interested in warding off a family history of Alzheimer’s and Dementia. Medicine can be so very powerful when we are able to identify the biochemical inefficiencies, apply specific dietary and nutritional remedies and compile a protocol to heal not just an individual, but generations. Thank you Ralph! Tim Walsh LAc

This is an incredible article! Very powerful information! Thank you so much for putting it together the way that you have. This information needs to get out to the masses. You explained that very well. Dr. Jones

Absolutely the BEST article I have read on the insulin/AD connection. As always, your brilliance is very much appreciated! Kristin Rotblatt, L.Ac.

Thank you so much for this well written article. Looking forward to future updates. Thanks for this well illustrated, researched, and detailed yet succinct article. Dr. Shah Roath

Company

Pin It on Pinterest